Uluru Facts

Uluru is probably Australia’s best-known natural landmark. The ancient monolith is pretty impressive close up and boasts intriguing statistics. Here are some facts on Uluru:

  • FACT: Uluru is better known as Ayers Rock; it named by William Gosse in 1873 after Sir Henry Ayers. Uluru is the Aboriginal and official name.
  • FACT: The rock was created over some 600 million years, and the Aborigines have been in the area for the last 10,000 years. It originally sat at the bottom of a sea, but today stands 348m above ground. One of the most startling Uluru facts however, is that some 2.5kms of its bulk is underground.
  • FACT: Uluru lies west of the Simpson Desert, not far from the ‘Red Centre’ of Australia, about 335kms southwest of Alice Springs (as the crow flies) and 463kms by road. Contrary to popular belief, it isn’t the biggest monolith in the world; Mount Augustus in Western Australia holds that title

More Uluru Facts

  • FACT: Other Uluru Facts: the rock is about 3.6kms long and 1.9kms wide, with a circumference of 9.4kms. The climb to the top is 1.6kms, much of which is at a steep angle, while the summit is generally flat. The surface is made up of valleys, ridges, caves and weird shapes that were created through erosion over millions of years. Surface oxidation of its iron content gives the would-be grey Uluru a striking orange-red hue.
  • FACT:  The nearby Kata Tjuta (or Olgas) are said to originate from a similar time. They are thought to have originally been one massive monolith, as opposed to the 36 separate domes they are today – one of the lesser known Uluru facts. They are a part of Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, which was founded in 1950 as ‘Ayers Rock-Mount Olga National Park’, changing to its current title in 1995. The Aboriginals own the land, although the Australian government currently holds a 99-year lease.

How big is Uluru?

Uluru…

  • is 348 metres (1141 feet) high
  • rises 863 metres (2,831 ft) above sea level
  • is 3.6 km long (2.2 miles)
  • is 1.9 km wide (1.2 miles)
  • is 9.4 km or 5.8 miles around the base
  • covers 3.33 km2 (1.29 miles2)
  • extends about several km/miles into the ground (no-one knows exactly how far)

How long does it take to walk around Uluru?

The Uluru Base Walk is a 10km walk on a flat marked dirt path, and can be completed in around 3.5 hours. Read more about the various walks around Uluru.

More Great Australian Facts

Map of Australia's Red Centre

Uluru / Ayers RockUluru / Ayers Rock
Great Barrier Reef IslandsAttractions

Experiences at Uluru + Kata Tjuta

Most visitors would have seen photos featuring Uluru, but nothing prepares you for the experience of being exposed to this expansive living cultural landscape. Experience many wonderful features of this region, including Uluru or Ayers Rock, and Kata Tjuta, also known as the Olgas.

More great Australian travel destinations
About 'Uluru Australia'

Uluru Australia is a 'Web Magazine' website that is dedicated to all things related to Uluru (Ayers Rock). We are passionate about Australia's iconic red centre, its vast open landscapes and the unforgetable experiences that are waiting for all who visit. Our aim is to discuss Uluru, its history, its environment, its wildlife and its spectacular destinations. We hope that this website will inspire all who visit, just as much as Uluru has inspired us.

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